Drugs By
Category

Diethylcarbamazine Clinical Trials

A Randomized, Placebo-controlled, Double-blind Pilot Study of Single-dose Humanized Anti-IL5 Antibody (Reslizumab) for the Reduction of Eosinophilia Following Diethylcarbamazine Treatment of Loa Loa Infection
Background: - Loa loa is a parasitic worm that infects people in West and Central Africa and is spread by the bite of a deerfly. Adult worms (macrofilariae) live under the skin and [more...]  cause symptoms such as swellings, itching, and hives. Smaller worms (microfilariae) are found in the bloodstream. Diethylcarbamazine (DEC), the recommended medication for Loa loa infection, can produce very serious side effects, especially in people with high numbers of parasites in the blood. Researchers are investigating new treatments for Loa loa that have fewer or less serious side effects. - DEC is the standard treatment for Loa loa infection, but it can cause mild side effects in persons with low numbers of parasites in their blood, including itchiness, muscle or joint pains, or swelling of the face or limbs. Currently, there is no way to effectively prevent these side effects. - Researchers believe that a certain kind of blood cells called eosinophils, which increase in the blood after DEC treatment, may be one of the causes of the side effects seen with DEC treatment. Reslizumab is a drug that helps prevent the increase of eosinophils in the blood. Giving reslizumab before DEC treatment might prevent the eosinophils from increasing and thereby might reduce some of the side effects from DEC. Objectives: - To determine whether reslizumab can prevent or reduce the side effects of treatment with DEC for Loa loa infestation. - To evaluate the effect of reslizumab as part of the treatment for Loa loa infestation. Eligibility: - Individuals between 18 and 65 years of age who have lived in or traveled to a loa-endemic region for at least 1 month. (Loa-endemic regions include northern Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, People's Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, and the Democratic Republic of Congo.) - Participants must have low numbers of parasites in the blood, as determined by the screening part of the study. Design: - This study will last 24 months and will involve several visits to the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. - Participants will be screened with a blood test for Loa loa parasites. Those who have a low number of Loa loa parasites in the blood will be asked to return for a full medical evaluation and the start of the treatment phase. Those who do not have Loa loa parasites in the blood, or those who have a high number of Loa loa parasites in the blood, are not eligible for this study treatment but may be eligible for other parasitic disease studies conducted by the National Institutes of Health. - Participants will have an initial visit with a full physical evaluation, and blood and urine tests (including leukapheresis to provide sufficient numbers of blood cells for testing). - Within 1 month of the first visit, participants will have a single infusion of either reslizumab or a placebo. The infusion visit is estimated to last approximately 5 hours. - Three to 7 days after the infusion, participants will begin a 21-day course of DEC (taken by mouth) to treat the infection. Participants will stay overnight at the Clinical Center during the first 3 days of treatment with DEC to be monitored for side effects, and will continue to take the DEC at home after the inpatient treatment. A study coordinator will call participants each day to ask about any symptoms or side effects. - Participants will be seen for an additional eight outpatient follow-up visits (at days 7, 14, and 28, and months 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24) for evaluation of signs and symptoms of infection.
Status: Recruiting Start Date: April 2010 Completion Date: May 2017
Post-Treatment Side Effects of Ivermectin or DEC for Loa Loa Infection
Background: - Loa loa is a small worm that infects people in West and Central Africa. It is spread by the bite of a fly. Adult worms live under the skin and can cause swelling in [more...]  the arms, legs, and face. Some people have more serious infections in the heart, kidneys, or brain. Most people with Loa loa infection have no symptoms at all. The standard treatment for Loa loa infection is a medicine called diethylcarbamazine (DEC). Some people have bad reactions to DEC, including itching, muscle pains, and in severe cases coma and death. - Another drug, ivermectin, is used in mass drug treatment programs to prevent the spread of worm infections that cause blindness and massive swelling (elephantiasis). However, people who also have Loa loa have had serious bad reactions to ivermectin. Researchers want to study both DEC and ivermectin to find out why these reactions occur. If they can be prevented, mass drug treatment programs will be able to be used in areas in Africa where Loa loa exists. Objectives: - To study the side effects of DEC and ivermectin treatment for Loa loa infection. Eligibility: - Individuals who live in 4 villages in Cameroon where Loa loa infection is known to exist, who are between 20 and 60 years of age, not pregnant or breastfeeding and have a low level of Loa loa parasites in the blood, but are otherwise healthy. Design: - Participants will be screened with a physical exam and medical history. Blood samples will be collected to check for Loa loa infection. Participants will also have an eye exam and provide skin samples to check for other worm infections that may interfere with the study treatment. - Participants will be admitted to the hospital for 4 days (during and after the treatment). They will receive a single dose of either DEC or ivermectin. - After treatment, regular blood samples will be collected. Participants will be asked questions about how they feel after treatment. Physical exams will be performed. If side effects develop, participants will be treated at the hospital. - After leaving the hospital, participants will have followup visits. These visits will happen on days 5, 7, 9, and 14 after receiving the study medicine. They will involve a short physical exam and collection of blood samples. - At the end of the study, participants will be offered a full 21-day DEC treatment to cure the Loa loa infection.
Status: Active, not recruiting Start Date: April 2012 Completion Date: August 2014
Effect of Albendazole Dose on Treatment of Lymphatic Filariasis
This study is conducted in Kerala, India. It will determine whether a new treatment regimen of albendazole and diethylcarbamazine (DEC) for lymphatic filariasis can eliminate the disease more quickly than the standard regimen. Lymphatic filariasis is caused by infection [more...]  with very small parasitic worms that are spread by mosquitoes. The disease can cause swelling of the arms, legs, breast and scrotum and can progress to permanent swelling of the legs or arms called elephantiasis. The study will see if a higher and more frequent dose of albendazole is better at clearing filarial worms from the blood than the current treatment. Healthy people between 18 and 55 years of age who are in good health and who are infected with filarial worms may be eligible for this study. Participants undergo the following procedures: 3-day hospital stay at the Filariasis Chemotherapy Unit of the T.D. Medical College Hospital in Kerala, India - Random assignment to receive either: 400 mg albendazole and DEC 300 mg given once a year for 2 years (standard treatment); or 800 mg albendazole and DEC 300 mg given once a year for 2 years; or 800 mg albendazole and DEC 300 mg given twice a year for 2 years. - Urine pregnancy test for women of childbearing age . - Ultrasound test to look for filarial worms. - Treatment dose. - Monitoring for symptoms 6-month 3-day hospital stay - Medical history, physical examination and blood test. - Repeat ultrasound in subjects whose first ultrasound detected adult worms. - Treatment dose for subjects receiving medicine every 6 months. - Urine pregnancy test for women of childbearing age. 1-year 3-day hospital stay - Medical history, physical examination and blood test. - Treatment dose. - Repeat ultrasound in subjects whose first ultrasound detected adult worms. - Urine pregnancy test for women of childbearing age. 18-month 3-day hospital stay - Medical history, physical examination and blood test. - Treatment dose for subjects receiving medicine every 6 months. - Urine pregnancy test for women of childbearing age. 24-month 3-day hospital stay - Medical history, physical examination and blood test. - Treatment dose. - Repeat ultrasound in subjects whose first ultrasound detected adult worms. - Urine pregnancy test for women of childbearing age.
Status: Active, not recruiting Start Date: July 2007 Completion Date: August 2014
Interaction Between HIV and Lymphatic Filariasis
The impact of lymphatic filariasis (LF) on HIV is assessed by measuring HIV viral load before and after DEC treatment of filariasis in double-infected individuals. The impact of HIV on lymphatic filariasis is assessed by measuring the success of DEC treatment on W. [more...]  bancrofti antigenaemia and microfilaraemia in double-infected individuals. The effect of DEC treatment in individuals with lymphatic filariasis and/or HIV is assessed by measuring the pre- and post-treatment level of HIV viral load, immunological responses and micronutritional parameters, including antioxidants and markers of oxidative stress, in single- or double-infected individuals. The study is carried out as an anonymous, unlinked and double-blind placebo controlled study with cross-over design. The study groups comprise: 1) 18 double-infected individuals (HIV+/LF+), 2) 16 HIV infected individuals (HIV+/LF-) and 3) 25 individuals with lymphatic filariasis (HIV-/LF+). Based on stratified, blocked randomisation the study participants receive DEC treatment or placebo. Pre- and post-treatment (1 week, 12 weeks and 24 weeks post-treatment) blood samples are collected and analysed for HIV viral load, CD4+ T cell count, distinctive Th1 and Th2 cytokines, circulating filarial antigens (CFA), micronutrient status, antioxidant enzymes and markers of oxidative stress. After 12 weeks the study participants get the opposite treatment and post-treatment blood samples are collected four times with the same intervals as above.
Status: Completed Start Date: August 2001 Completion Date: November 2002

 

Clinical trials allow volunteers access to medical treatment options before they are available to the general public. Participants often receive the best healthcare available for their condition.

Risks are a reality, however, and may include more frequent doctor visits, health risks (possibly life-threatening), and/or the treatment being ineffective. Trials are federally regulated with strict guidelines to protect participants.

Diethylcarbamazine Clinical Trials Information presented on ClinicalTrialsSearch.org is not intended to be a substitute for qualified medical advice visit or treatment with a real physician. We are not physicians. Always consult with a medical doctor (MD). ClinicalTrialsSearch.org is a website dedicated to listing clinical research studies in human subjects, including those specifically related to Diethylcarbamazine. Clinical research trials and medical trials take place in hundreds of cities across the United States. A clinical trial or clinical study is a research project with human volunteer subjects. Clinical drug trials and pharmaceutical clinical trials generally measure the effectiveness of new treatments and drugs. The purpose of the studies is to answer specific human health questions. Clinical trials are a popular way for doctors, government agencies, and private sector companies to find treatments for all kinds of conditions. Clinical trials allow volunteers access to medical treatment options before they are available to the general public. Many times the participants receive treatment for free, and sometimes they are paid for their time. Participants often receive the best healthcare available possible for their condition. Risks are a reality, however, and may include more frequent doctor visits, health risks (possibly life-threatening), and/or the treatment being ineffective. U.S. - based Diethylcarbamazine studies are federally regulated with strict guidelines to protect patients.

Latest Clinical
Trials News
Diabetes Clinical Trials search for new treatments and cures
03/14/2010

There are a number of clinical trials underway to find effective treatments for diabetes, including new drugs, surgery and even transplantation.

Feeling Depressed? A clinical trial might help.
03/07/2010

There are several current and ongoing trials of interventions for major depressive disorder, which is characterized by a disabling combination of symptoms causing severe disruption to the sufferer's ability to carry out routine functions and tasks of daily life.

The State of Constipation Clinical Trials
02/28/2010

Constipation is a illness where the bowels cannot move waste material out of the body in a normal manner. There are various clinical trials recruiting participants to study the effectiveness of various treatments.

view more...